Mitas E07+ Adventure Tyre Review

Tyres, one of the most talked about subjects amongst bikers but crucially one of the most important necessities.

For someone who rides many miles a year, I go through my fair share of tyres and I’ve tried several different brands. One of them is Mitas, a European company who’s roots originate in Czech Republic and were previously recognised for their design and manufacture of agricultural tyres. Over the last few years they have become a popular brand for adventure riders and are now Europe’s seconds largest off road tyre supplier

Mitas offer a broad range of tyres, from Motocross nobblies to road tyres for a moped. The Mitas E07 has been a favourite of mine for some years now, the E07 now comes in three flavours E07 Enduro, E07 Dakar and their latest and redeveloped addition; The Mitas E07+ (or “adventure”)

The Mitas E07 range has always been a hard compound tyre, making some riders nervous even contemplating using them in the wet but they needn’t be, it performs very well in the wet and provides adequate grip off road on dirt trails. The tyre is very grippy in the dry on tarmac, I have been surprised at times when I hear my pegs scrapping on my Africa Twin CRF1000!

The Dakar version however has a much thicker tyre wall, designed to take hits from gnarly rocks and craggy trails. It’s a great tyre nonetheless but get a puncture and you’ll be shedding blood, sweat, and tears trying to get it off the rim!

So, onto the Mitas E07+, a new tyre and only available in limited sizes at present in the UK. I have to make do with a 18″ rear E07+ and a 21″ E07 Enduro at the front as they don’t yet come in 21″ sizes. That said the bike handled as well as can be expected with 50/50 tyres.

The E07+ has different block pattern to the E07 Enduro, side by side at a distance it’s not overly noticeable but close up you can see the differences and appreciate why you’d get better grip on the edge where you need it most. On tarmac they vibrated like mad for the first 1,000 miles, especially at lower speeds due to the spacing between the tread blocks. The vibration was so bad at one pint I was beginning to think I had a serious problem with the bike set up, almost convincing myself the wheels were unbalanced, damaged bearing or otherwise.

By the the time you get used to the vibration it subsides as the tread wears off the worst of those clean edges fresh from the mould.

Cornering was nerve wrecking for the first 1,000 miles also, usually after about 250-500 miles the Mitas E07 settles in and you can begin to lean the bike over to a respectable angle but the E07+ didn’t feel settled. Every sharp bend the rear would try to slip out, so I found myself leaning the bike upright on many occasions to counter the effect. That said, after 1,000 miles they stuck like glue to tarmac and in the wet they performed very well. I never had an issue even riding at what I would consider to be a progressive pace for the conditions. I was impressed with the grip in the wet once they’d had their extended scrubbing in period. So thumbs up there.

Having riden to Morocco via Spain, I’ve clocked up almost 4,000 miles on them and can genuinely say it looks like there’s at least another 4,000 miles left of tread before I need to start worrying about replacing them. I feel the lifespan on the E07+ will be very welcomed for the price.

Overall, I am impressed and it seems Mitas have delivered what they claimed, a better gripping tyre with longer lifespan and without breaking the bank. They also look pretty cool as well!

http://www.mitas-moto.com/en/mitas-moto/products/motorcycle–trail–tires/e-07-plus

Comments

19/11/2018
Good write up Chris and I witnessed those tight bends. I was behind you on the mitas terra force a 90/10 tyre. Very reasonable price and I managed to stick with the big boys on the tarmac without sliding out and even left some of them behind on the dirt. No significant wear or squaring off either.

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